asian mamas working in the arts

events


Oct
27
1:00 PM13:00

farming as justice work & japanese american women authors’ panel

farming as justice work. 1-3pm.                                                       kellee matsushita utilizes seed sovereignty as a platform for justice work; as a tool to build community power, reclaim ancestral knowledge, and work towards collective liberation. the history of california’s japanese american farmers will be explored. kellee will talk about the legacy of the shiso trees still growing that are the living record of our presence after we were taken from our land and incarcerated.   

japanese american women authors’ panel. 4-5pm.                     

join artists keiko agena, yumi sakugawa and marinaomi for a panel discussion about how they have financially built their careers as japanese american women artists and the journey it has taken to cultivate such a singularly unique voice in their creative work. this panel is moderated by artist and filmmaker tani ikeda.  

__

these events are connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

 

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.



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Oct
26
7:00 PM19:00

jaws film screening

jaws film screening. 7-9pm.                                                        

screening of award-winning filmmaker renee tajima pena’s documentary “my america. . . . or honk if you love buddah” followed by a short film program and discussed with filmmakers tani ikeda, kyoko takenaka, sharon yamoto and hannah watanabe-rocco.

__

this event is connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

 

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.



View Event →
long distance stories: a night of fil am history & storytelling
Oct
25
6:30 PM18:30

long distance stories: a night of fil am history & storytelling

visual communications and long distance podcast are proud to present linda mabalot’s 1978 documentary film manong on october 25, larry itliong day, during filipino american history month. mabalot’s narration, combined with archival images, animated sequences, and poignant interviews with old members of the manong generation offer deep insight into the lives of some of the first filipinos in america.

the screening will be followed by an excerpt from an episode of long distance, a new independent narrative podcast about life in the filipino diaspora. there will be a pre-reception and post-screening discussion with guests and audience members about the past and present of filipino american storytelling through nonfiction forms like documentaries, podcasts, photography, literature, and more.

rsvp on facebook event page strongly encouraged.

event hosted and moderated by paola mardo (audio producer & host/creator of long distance). for more info about long distance: longdistanceradio.com. listen to the trailer and subscribe for free: apple.co/2npstre.

++++++++++++++

program line-up:

6:30pm pre-reception
7:30pm screening of manong
8:15pm presentation of long distance excerpt
8:25pm discussion with special guests
9:00pm mix and mingle

discussion guests:

dr. anthony c. ocampo (sociologist & author, “the latinos of asia: how filipino americans break the rules of race”)
abraham ferrer (archives & distribution manager, visual communications)
rozette rago (freelance photographer & associate photo editor, wirecutter at the new york times)
this filipino american life

directions:

visual communications is located in the basement of the union center for the arts building. entrance is through the red door on the south side of the building.

parking:

metered street parking and other pay lots in the area. best place to park would be the aiso parking garage across the street. $3 flat after 5pm.

View Event →
Oct
25
6:00 PM18:00

jaws’ tiny couch performances

jaws’ tiny couch performances. 6-8:30pm.                                    

rey fukuda, musician from the tv series vida, and honolulu singer, danielle oda will be sharing new original works in an intimate living room setting with wine and cheese. this musical series will be recorded and requires an rsvp to tani.ikeda@gmail.com for guests.

__

this event is connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

 

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.



View Event →
Oct
25
11:30 AM11:30

beyond the personal: lessons we learned from camp

beyond the personal: lessons we learned from camp. 11:30am-1:30pm.

redress activist jim matsuoka will be joined by diana tsuchida of tessaku project and writer and artist, kyoko nakamaru, for a second lunchtime discussion about life after the camps, where we explore the threads of the stories less frequently told. a light lunch will be provided with a gluten-free, dairy-free option. space is limited to 12. please rsvp to nakamaru@protonmail.com.

__

this event is connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

 

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.


View Event →
Oct
24
6:00 PM18:00

dreaming for the collective: calling in the sacred on the full moon

dreaming for the collective: calling in the sacred on the full moon. 6-8pm.

using sound, music, meditation and poetry, kyoko takenaka and kyoko nakamaru invite asian american femmes to dream into ancestral healing, expand into their most authentic selves and call in their sacred selves on the full hunter’s moon. please bring a journal and writing utensil.


__

this event is connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

 

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.


View Event →
Oct
23
5:30 PM17:30

a founding spirit: returning to our origin story

a founding spirit: returning to our origin story.  5:30pm-7:30pm.

executive director at the armory center for the arts, leslie ito, will moderate a talk story circle that invites participants to share their founding spirit. the phrase founding spirit references the essence, the philosophy, the feeling that is evoked through a certain action, specific interaction or a conscious arrangement. leslie ito believes we don’t need to reinvent ourselves, instead perhaps we need to return to a founding spirit of who we are. leslie believes strongly that if we can identify, articulate and explore that founding spirit, as artists, arts and cultural practitioners and as living culture bearers-- that we can recenter the dialogue, and more importantly, move our rich cultures to the center--dissipating the current dominant culture.

__

this event is connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

 

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.


View Event →
Oct
22
11:00 AM11:00

roots before branches: storytelling as medicine

roots before branches: storytelling as medicine. 11am-3pm.
 diana tsuchida invites our japanese american elders in to share their experiences of living through wwii, and invites their grandchildren/kids/relatives to join them in the conversation if they wish to. the interviews will be recorded solely on audio, with a few photos taken, then published online. storytellers may request that the interviews are only shown to the families. each interview session is allotted for 60 to 90 minutes, but shorter sessions can be arranged. please schedule a session by emailing diana at emiko@tessaku.com with your preferred time!

__

this event is connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

 

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.


View Event →
Oct
21
5:00 PM17:00

all-camp intergenerational coming together

all-camp intergenerational coming together. 5pm-7:30pm. informal social gathering open to all. please join us for open sharing of poetry, spoken word and intergenerational dialogue about how our history affects us and engages future nikkei generations.

__

this event is connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

 

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.


View Event →
Oct
20
2:00 PM14:00

survivor love letter: radical survivor media

survivor love letter: radical survivor media. 2-4pm.         

founder of the viral survivor letter writing movement, tani ikeda will moderate a media justice and letter writing workshop for survivors of sexual assault along with therapist and community healer, traci ishigo. this workshop centers the experiences of japanese american women, trans, and gender nonconforming survivors. allies are encouraged to come and participate in writing a love letter to a survivor in their life.  

__

this event is connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.

View Event →
Oct
18
6:30 PM18:30

letters to our future grandmothers: a healing-share workshop

letters to our future grandmothers: a healing-share workshop. 6:30-8pm.

in this workshop, facilitated by artist and tuesday night cafe founder, traci kato-kiriyama, we’ll talk story about lessons learned from our grandmothers.  after some intentional breath and vocal practice, we will write letters to our grandmothers and future grandchildren.

accessibility note:  we will have some organic essential oils used by the facilitator in their healing/health practice.

__

this event is connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.

View Event →
what does food gentrification mean for LA?
Oct
18
6:00 PM18:00

what does food gentrification mean for LA?

The impact of gentrification in LA’s rapidly changing neighborhoods has been widely discussed as it pertains to housing, transportation and jobs. But what about its impact on what reaches communities’ plates? Has “food gentrification” made accessing traditional, nourishing cultural foods more costly and marketed at a new audience?

Join us on October 18th to explore the intersections of business, culture, economic development and displacement all through the lens of food. We will be joined by a diverse panel of chefs, policy leaders and small business owners to unpack the topic of “food gentrification” and what it means for Los Angeles.

Speakers will be announced in the coming weeks!

October 18th

Doors open at 5:30pm, programming will start promptly at 6pm. 
6:00pm-8:00pm
Taper Auditorium

L.A. Central Library

PARKING: 

Please validate parking tickets at the Info Desk with a library card for the reduced rate of $1 for all vehicles entering the lot after 3pm. Please validate upon arrival because validation will not be available after the library closes at 8pm. Cars remaining past 8:15pm pay the regular parking rate of $8.

TRAFFIC ADVISORY:

Due to lane and street closures near Central Library, plan ahead and allow extra time to reach your destination.

ADA ACCOMODATIONS:

Please call (213) 22807430 at least 72 hours prior to the event.

View Event →
Oct
18
11:30 AM11:30

beyond the personal: lessons we learned from camp

beyond the personal: lessons we learned from camp. 11:30am-1:30pm.


redress activist jim matsuoka will be joined by diana tsuchida of tessaku project and writer and artist, kyoko nakamaru, for an engaged lunchtime discussion where we look beyond personal suffering and military accomplishment and ask each other, what lessons have we really learned from camp? a light lunch will be provided with a gluten-free, dairy-free option. space is limited to 12. please rsvp to nakamaru@protonmail.com.

__

this event is connected to “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” an exhibition at 341 FSN.

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (JAWS) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 FSN, 341 E. 1st St., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

The exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.

View Event →
opening of "seeds of our grandmothers' dreams"
Oct
15
5:00 PM17:00

opening of "seeds of our grandmothers' dreams"

“seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” re-imagines a world blossoming with the unbroken yume our nikkei elders carried across the pacific: before they were forced into american concentration camps.

on october 14 - 28, japanese american women speak (jaws) will exhibit their art and invite community to decolonize their dreams through a series of storytelling workshops at 341 fsn, 341 e. 1st st., los angeles. “seeds of our grandmothers’ dreams” activates the thriving future of little tokyo—an international community rooted over generations—through a galaxy of intergenerational artists dreaming above ground.

the exhibition is part of an effort by little tokyo service center to help save little tokyo and keep our neighborhood within our own community.

related events: 

monday, october 15

techniques in painting with alcohol inks. 6:30-8:00pm.              

join new york based printmaker and painter, sonomi kobayashi, for a hands-on tutorial on working with alcohol ink. no previous experience painting necessary to come learn some new tools for your artistic basket. the workshop is free and materials are provided. space is limited to 20, first come first served.  

 

thursday, october 18

beyond the personal: lessons we learned from camp. 11:30am-1:30pm.


redress activist jim matsuoka will be joined by diana tsuchida of tessaku project and writer and artist, kyoko nakamaru, for an engaged lunchtime discussion where we look beyond personal suffering and military accomplishment and ask each other, what lessons have we really learned from camp? a light lunch will be provided with a gluten-free, dairy-free option. space is limited to 12. please rsvp to nakamaru@protonmail.com.

 

letters to our future grandmothers: a healing-share workshop. 6:30-8pm.

in this workshop, facilitated by artist and tuesday night cafe founder, traci kato-kiriyama, we’ll talk story about lessons learned from our grandmothers.  after some intentional breath and vocal practice, we will write letters to our grandmothers and future grandchildren.

accessibility note:  we will have some organic essential oils used by the facilitator in their healing/health practice.

saturday, october 20                                                                                  

survivor love letter: radical survivor media. 2-4pm.         

founder of the viral survivor letter writing movement, tani ikeda will moderate a media justice and letter writing workshop for survivors of sexual assault along with therapist and community healer, traci ishigo. this workshop centers the experiences of japanese american women, trans, and gender nonconforming survivors. allies are encouraged to come and participate in writing a love letter to a survivor in their life.   

 

sunday, october 21

all-camp intergenerational coming together. 5pm-7:30pm. informal social gathering open to all. please join us for open sharing of poetry, spoken word and intergenerational dialogue about how our history affects us and engages future nikkei generations.

 

monday, october 22                                                                                          

roots before branches: storytelling as medicine. 11am-3pm.
 diana tsuchida invites our japanese american elders in to share their experiences of living through wwii, and invites their grandchildren/kids/relatives to join them in the conversation if they wish to. the interviews will be recorded solely on audio, with a few photos taken, then published online. storytellers may request that the interviews are only shown to the families. each interview session is allotted for 60 to 90 minutes, but shorter sessions can be arranged. please schedule a session by emailing diana at emiko@tessaku.com with your preferred time!

tuesday, october 23                                                                                                      

a founding spirit: returning to our origin story.  5:30pm-7:30pm.

executive director at the armory center for the arts, leslie ito, will moderate a talk story circle that invites participants to share their founding spirit. the phrase founding spirit references the essence, the philosophy, the feeling that is evoked through a certain action, specific interaction or a conscious arrangement. leslie ito believes we don’t need to reinvent ourselves, instead perhaps we need to return to a founding spirit of who we are. leslie believes strongly that if we can identify, articulate and explore that founding spirit, as artists, arts and cultural practitioners and as living culture bearers-- that we can recenter the dialogue, and more importantly, move our rich cultures to the center--dissipating the current dominant culture.   

 

wednesday, october 24

dreaming for the collective: calling in the sacred on the full moon. 6-8pm.

using sound, music, meditation and poetry, kyoko takenaka and kyoko nakamaru invite asian american femmes to dream into ancestral healing, expand into their most authentic selves and call in their sacred selves on the full hunter’s moon. please bring a journal and writing utensil.

 

thursday, october 25                                                                                    

beyond the personal: lessons we learned from camp. 11:30am-1:30pm.                                                                                                redress activist jim matsuoka will be joined by diana tsuchida of tessaku project and writer and artist, kyoko nakamaru, for a second lunchtime discussion about life after the camps, where we explore the threads of the stories less frequently told. a light lunch will be provided with a gluten-free, dairy-free option. space is limited to 12. please rsvp to nakamaru@protonmail.com.

jaws’ tiny couch performances. 6-8:30pm.                                    

rey fukuda, musician from the tv series vida, and honolulu singer, danielle oda will be sharing new original works in an intimate living room setting with wine and cheese. this musical series will be recorded and requires an rsvp to tani.ikeda@gmail.com for guests.

friday, october 26                                                                                               

jaws film screening. 7-9pm.                                                        screening of award-winning filmmaker renee tajima pena’s documentary “my america. . . . or honk if you love buddah” followed by a short film program and discussed with filmmakers tani ikeda, kyoko takenaka, sharon yamoto and hannah watanabe-rocco.

 

saturday, october 27                                                                                   

farming as justice work. 1-3pm.                                                       kellee matsushita utilizes seed sovereignty as a platform for justice work; as a tool to build community power, reclaim ancestral knowledge, and work towards collective liberation. the history of california’s japanese american farmers will be explored. kellee will talk about the legacy of the shiso trees still growing that are the living record of our presence after we were taken from our land and incarcerated.   

japanese american women authors’ panel. 4-5pm.                     

join artists keiko agena, yumi sakugawa and marinaomi for a panel discussion about how they have financially built their careers as japanese american women artists and the journey it has taken to cultivate such a singularly unique voice in their creative work. this panel is moderated by artist and filmmaker tani ikeda.  


View Event →
action! presents alima lee & friends - portal 1 and more
Oct
13
8:00 PM20:00

action! presents alima lee & friends - portal 1 and more

action! cinema as connection presents alima lee & friends - portals i: a gesture towards new black femme screen narratives - 8 pm

doors 7:30; free event!

this free screening is part of action! cinema as connection, a free series presenting political documentary films and workshops. curated by penelope uribe-abee, action! is made possible with the support of the academy of motion picture arts and sciences.

program:

portals i:
a gesture towards new black femme screen narratives. (2018)

portals are openings, specific entrées through which something might be viewed or moved: elaborate and glamorous in of themselves -- the destination is elevated by the threshold itself. in fantasy, portals operate as a symbol for cataclysmic change, the moment after which the protagonist's worldview is not the same.

alima lee and mandy harris williams present portals i: the first dispatch in a series of short experimental documentary films that feature black women who challenge the narrative of how the world sees them. featuring punk band, fupu (fuck u pay us), artist/educator shani peters, stripper/activist gizelle marie, and filmmaker ja'tovia gary.

directed by: alima lee & mandy harris williams; director of photography: alima lee
edited by: alima lee; written by: mandy harris williams; total run time: 27minutes

la fleur noire (2017)
vhs, directed by alima lee & chris bordenave
cinematography & editing by alima lee
score by kelsey lu
total run time: 5 minutes

son. artist profile : duckwrth (2017)
vhs, directed by alima lee & justen leroy
cinematography & editing by alima lee
total run time: 5 minutes

naia (2017)
8mm, directed & edited by alima lee
total run time: 6 minutes

garden (2017)
8mm, directed & edited by alima lee
total run time: 6 minutes

View Event →
a grammar built with rocks: opening reception
Oct
13
5:00 PM17:00

a grammar built with rocks: opening reception

opening saturday, october 13 at one archives at the usc libraries from 5–8pm
on view october 13–december 22, 2018

marwa arsanios, pauline boudry / renate lorenz, shannon ebner, and park mcarthu

curated by shoghig halajian and suzy halajian

a grammar built with rocks presents artistic practices that trace the racialized and gendered relationship between bodies and land, and question narratives of socioecological crisis that contribute to the displacement and erasure of people and collective formations. through a two-part group exhibition, public programing, and publication, the project aims to think with the land—materially and relationally—in order to unpack and historicize notions of waste and contamination as they relate to the politics of access, property, and the violence of land allotment. together, the featured works explore how the materiality of land permeates our identities and representational structures, and simultaneously molds the body.

the project appropriates its title from édouard glissant’s writings, as it looks to the ways in which the landscape contains, unfolds, and narrates its own history. it searches for traceable fissures within contested sites, as an aftermath of violence and altering states of upheaval. the exhibition at human resources considers the material, psychic, and social relations that constitute place as a site of knowledge production, and the “below” (below-ground, below-surface) as emblematic of both resistance and retreat. together, the works and programs ex-pose the violence inherent in geographic processes (of territorialization, privatization, and urban renewal) and offer artistic methodologies (of documentation, performance, and embodied archival practices) that surface buried histories and reorient perspectives to understand land as a bearer of relationships, resilience, and memory. the exhibition at one archives at the usc libraries extends this inquiry to center on the interrelation between the body and place, exploring how discourses of value and waste (through motifs of the toxic, the disposable, the contaminant) influence individual and collective spatial agency within the landscape, the institution, the state).

a grammar built with rocks began with research into the 1950s history of the chavez ravine evictions, and expanded with the following questions: how does unearthing soil, sediments, remnants, and buried life-forms open up space for concealed voices and histories, and reveal interconnected systems of power and violence on people and place? what does thinking geography relationally rather than territorially look like? how do meta-narratives of development, modernization, and crisis contribute to practices of dispossession?

the project includes the following exhibition and programming:

human resources la: http://humanresourcesla.com/event/a-grammar-built-with-rocks/

opening saturday, september 29 from 7-10pm

on view september 29–november 4, 2018

carmen argote, julien creuzet, daar (decolonizing architecture art residency), sandra de la loza, regina josé galindo, adam khalil, zack khalil and jackson polys, zara kuredjian, uriel orlow, gala porras-kim, susan silton, and cauleen smith

publication

newly commissioned and existing text contributors include: antke engel and renate lorenz, daar (decolonizing architecture art residency), sandra de la loza, raquel gutiérrez, shoghig halajian, suzy halajian, candice lin, and carl a. zimring.

a grammar built with rocks is supported by the cultural services of the french embassy, goethe-institut, foundation for contemporary arts emergency grant, one archives at the usc libraries, and pasadena art alliance.

image: pauline boudry/renate lorenz, toxic, 2012. installation with super 16mm film / hd, 13 minutes and archive. courtesy of the artists


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jackie wang on carceral capitalism
Oct
13
3:00 PM15:00

jackie wang on carceral capitalism

organized by semiotext(e)

join us for an afternoon with jackie wang. she will read and discuss her latest book, carceral capitalism. book signing to follow. semiotext(e) will provide copies for sale at event.

about carceral capitalism:

"the crisis of 21st century policing and prisons, writes jackie wang in carceral capitalism, is a story about nerds and cops." in wang’s brilliant new book—released this past february by mit’s semiotext(e) / intervention series—the racist cop, judge, and banker fade to the background, all but replaced by a figureless but no less nefarious avatar: the algorithm. 'color-blind' predictive policing tools dispatch cops to terrorize black and brown neighborhoods, while recidivist models dole out racially-biased sentences and credit reports use zip codes as a proxy for race. the technologies may have evolved, but the prerogative remains the same: to police, to contain, to profit.

'at its core, carceral capitalism asks a seemingly simple question: what is the price of policing and prisons? wang offers an incisive critique of 21st century racial capitalism. she exposes the financial 'inclusion' of black and brown low-income communities through subprime lending as a new form of racialized accumulation, and traces the neoliberal state’s abdication of its responsibility as a provider of social services in favor of its role as guarantor of 'security'” but despite the depth of wang’s political economic analysis, she is equally concerned with the crushing psychological and moral costs of mass incarceration, a system which—despite its promise of safety for white america—she describes as fundamentally 'anti-life.'"

mark tseng-putterman, the margins
jackie wang is a student of the dream state, black studies scholar, prison abolitionist, poet, performer, library rat, trauma monster and phd candidate at harvard university. she is the author of carceral capitalism (semiotexte / mit press), a number of punk zines including on being hard femme, and a collection of dream poems titled tiny spelunker of the oneiro-womb (capricious). find her @loneberrywang and loneberry.tumblr.com.

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variety of futurisms
Oct
13
12:00 PM12:00

variety of futurisms

  • Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

center for discursive inquiry at california institute of the arts presents a new research group under the theme of “variety of futurisms.” convened by sara mameni, this series explores afro-arab futurisms in contemporary art and cultural production.center for discursive inquiry at california institute of the arts presents a new research group under the theme of “variety of futurisms.” convened by sara mameni, this series explores afro-arab futurisms in contemporary art and cultural production.

in the past decade artists have responded to ongoing wars and continued corporate/imperial practices in the middle-east and north africa with alternative visions of the future. we have seen national conceptions of palestine as a single high-rise tended to by a woman in a space-suite in the work of larissa sansour for instance, and artists working under the heading of “gulf futurism” in response to fast growing urban spaces in the persian/arab gulf region. in light of these practices, this research group attempts to contextualize speculative arab futurism in relation to longer traditions of futurist resistance in afrofuturism.in the past decade artists have responded to ongoing wars and continued corporate/imperial practices in the middle-east and north africa with alternative visions of the future. we have seen national conceptions of palestine as a single high-rise tended to by a woman in a space-suite in the work of larissa sansour for instance, and artists working under the heading of “gulf futurism” in response to fast growing urban spaces in the persian/arab gulf region. in light of these practices, this research group attempts to contextualize speculative arab futurism in relation to longer traditions of futurist resistance in afrofuturism.


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plant your own boundaries
Oct
13
10:30 AM10:30

plant your own boundaries

  • asian americans advancing justice (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

organized by api equality - la

in what ways do we define self-care? is self care in the food we eat, the love we make, and the tea we spill?

come out to api equality-la’s second installment of the community wellness workshop series, as we unpack what it means to take care of yourself and take care of the communities we are apart of. the workshop will include a session on how to set boundaries and a discussion on the ways physical and mental wellness can be achieved together despite being limited by the world around us.

as always, there will be food! hope to see you there!
please rsvp before 10/11/2018!: bit.ly/wellness10-13

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human resources for art workers
Oct
3
7:00 PM19:00

human resources for art workers

  • womens center for creative work (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

hosted by christy roberts berkowitz
free

if you were sexually harassed by a fellow artist in your group exhibition, who would you report that to? if a curator was clearly tokenizing your identity and proceeded to enact several microaggressive gestures towards you, who would you report that to? if a gallerist has failed to pay you for the sale of your work in a reasonable amount of time, who would you report that to? do you feel uncomfortable asking to be paid w.a.g.e. certified fees? have you noticed certain art spaces creating hostile or predatory cultures towards women and/or people of color?

human resources for art workers (not to be confused with the art space) is an idea for a service-based art workers union. our intention is to utilize tools such as restorative justice, mediation and conflict resolution, legal council, support groups, and mutual aid resources. this is a conversation, a working group, and a community building exercise. if you are interested in brainstorming, cultivating, and/or co-organizing for art workers rights, please joins us as we collectively begin to wade into these waters.

about christy roberts berkowitz

artist, educator, agitator, and emotional laborer, christy roberts berkowitz, composes experiences, images, and objects that attempt to reconcile the intersections of resistance and escapism, expectation and failure, subject and object, community and individualism. a third generation southern californian, christy roberts berkowitz holds bachelor degrees in philosophy and religion, a bfa in studio art, and an mfa from claremont graduate university. she is an associate professor in the riverside community college district & at the university of la verne, and has organized in/with/at: freewaves, current la, kchung, glitzer, the california poppy collective, problematic radio, the los angeles dept. of cultural affairs, moca los angeles, the getty museum, the telfair museum, the chrysler museum, redcat, the hammer museum, the los angeles county museum of art, the orange county museum of art, the los angeles municipal art gallery, asylum arts, the institute for jewish creativity, the righteous persons fund, human resources, perform chinatown, eastside international los angeles, the women’s center for creative work, the institute 4 labor generosity workers and uniforms, summercamp’s projectproject, los angeles contemporary exhibitions, greene exhibitions, among many others. roberts berkowitz has written for art21 magazine, citizens of culture, undo magazine, and was one of la weekly’s best of la people, 2012.

twitter: @radical_flowers
ig: radicalflowers

accessibility: wccw has a 36” wide ramp at our front entrance and a stairway with 8 steps and a rail. there are 2 gender neutral restrooms. one restroom is wheelchair accessible, with a handrail. we provide scent free soaps and encourage guests to attend our events scent free. if you require asl interpretation, cart, interpretation for a language other than english, supervised childcare, or have any other access needs or questions, please contact info@wccw.us at least two weeks in advance. it is our practice to do everything we can to create a safe and accessible space.

parking, accessibility & transportation info: http://womenscenterforcreativework.com/visitor-info/

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member pricing info:

torchbearer level members get 20% off all regular tickets while warrior level members and above can attend for free. the free spots are first come, first served, and make up 25% of the program capacity. sign up to be a member to get your discount code! email info@wccw.us with any questions.

our program costs go directly towards compensation of the instructors and staffers who work the event. we want to make programming as accessible as possible to anyone who is interested, however, so we offer volunteer opportunities in exchange for membership, as well as free community tickets to each program (number varies depending on capacity of the class). email info@wccw.us for more info or to find out more about these opportunities for a specific event.

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carpooling:

want to come to an event but don't have a ride? or, do you have the capacity, enthusiasm, and a car to help out a friend? please post in the discussion section of this event to connect with folks who are interested in carpooling!


childcare:

email us at info@wccw.us if you’re interested in having on-site childcare at an event and we will do our best to accommodate!

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lauren halsey: we still here, there (mar 4–sept 3, 2018) (closing)
Sep
3
10:00 AM10:00

lauren halsey: we still here, there (mar 4–sept 3, 2018) (closing)

lauren halsey: we still here, there

the museum of contemporary art, los angeles (moca), presents lauren halsey: we still here, there, a site-specific installation work created at moca’s grand avenue location. this spring los angeles–based artist lauren halsey (b. 1987, los angeles, california) will take up residence at moca grand avenue, where she will build and regularly change an immersive space resembling a fantastical system of caves that viewers are invited to linger in and explore. this environment will serve as a visionary archive reflecting the diversity of everyday black cultural experiences in south central l.a., the artist’s home since childhood.

lauren halsey will continue to publicly transform her installation during the run of the exhibition. she will be in gallery every other week on alternating fridays and saturdays, beginning saturday, march 10.

select dates are listed below:
march 10
march 23
april 7
april 20
may 5
may 18

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spa night screening + Q&A with andrew ahn and karen tongson
Sep
1
8:00 PM20:00

spa night screening + Q&A with andrew ahn and karen tongson

gyopo invites you to a screening of andrew ahn's film, "spa night" (2016), in the purple garden at the underground musuem, followed by a conversation and q&a between writer and director andrew ahn and author, cultural critic, and podcaster karen tongson. together, they will discuss queerness in the context of us asian american, immigrant, and poc communities; how queerness flourishes and how it is monitored; how we grapple with ideas of homophobia in minority communities; and how queerness is translated across generations and traditions.

about the film:
los angeles' korean spas serve as meeting place and bridge between past and future for generations of immigrant families; spa night explores one korean-american family’s dreams and realities as each struggles with the overlap of personal desire, disillusionment and sense of tradition.

andrew ahn is a queer korean-american filmmaker born and raised in los angeles. his feature film spa night premiered at the 2016 sundance film festival where lead actor joe seo won a special jury award for breakthrough performance. the film also won the john cassavetes independent spirit award in 2017. ahn workshopped spa night in the sundance screenwriters lab, the film independent screenwriting lab, and the film independent directing lab. ahn recently directed the entire first season of the sundance now original show this close from creators shoshannah stern and josh feldman. ahn is an alum of film independent’s project involve. he has promoted diversity in the arts by mentoring youth filmmakers through programs like pacific arts movement’s reel voices, outfest’s outset, and the sundance institute's native filmmaker lab. he graduated from brown university and received an mfa in film directing from the california institute of the arts (calarts).

karen tongson is the author of "relocations: queer suburban imaginaries" (nyu press), and associate professor of english, gender & sexuality studies, and american studies and ethnicity at usc. her writing and cultural commentary has appeared in the los angeles times, l.a. weekly, buzzfeed reader, npr, the washington post, and public books, as well as in the academic journals, public culture, social text, glq, american quarterly, and nineteenth-century literature, among other public and scholarly venues. she has a forthcoming book with ut press on "why karen carpenter matters," and has two books in progress: "empty orchestra: karaoke, aesthetics and queer theory" (duke university press) and "normporn: queer tv spectatorship after the 'new normalcy.'" postmillennial pop, the award-winning book series she co-edits with henry jenkins at nyu press, has published over a twenty titles. you can also hear karen talk about pop culture, the arts and entertainment on the weekly pop rocket podcast, hosted by comedian guy branum. for more information, visit www.karentongson.org. twitter: @inlandemperor | instagram: @tongsonator

 

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writ large press: tanzila “taz” ahmed, alan nakagawa & jenny yang
Aug
28
6:30 PM18:30

writ large press: tanzila “taz” ahmed, alan nakagawa & jenny yang

for this third event of the icons series, writ large presents writer and podcaster tanzila “taz” ahmed (good muslim/bad muslim), sound artist alan nakagawa and comedian jenny yang.

"icons & influences" is the title of this three-event discussion series from writ large press. at each event, three artists are invited to read, show, or perform a work that profoundly influenced them, then present one of their own works. over the course of these readings and discussions, the touchpoints and inspirations of contemporary artists working in a variety of modes and cultural backgrounds will be explored.

tanzila “taz” ahmed is an activist, storyteller, and organizer based in los angeles. her writing developed around creating a counternarrative for the communities she belonged to, whether youth, muslim, south asian, or counterculture. she is cohost of the #goodmuslimbadmuslim podcast, which has been featured in oprah magazine, wired, and buzzfeed as well as live shows recorded at south by southwest and the white house. she can be read monthly in her “radical love” column at loveinshallah.com. she was a long-time writer for sepia mutiny and is published in the anthology love, inshallah: the secret love lives of american muslim women. her personal projects include writing about desi music at mishthi music, where she co-produced “beats for bangladesh,” making #muslimvday cards and curating images for mutinous mind state. in 2016, ahmed was honored as a white house champion of change for asian american and pacific islander art and storytelling. an avid essayist, she had a monthly column called radical love, was a blogger for sepia mutiny, has written for truthout, the aerogram, the nation, left turn magazine, and more. she is published in forthcoming anthology good girls marry doctors (2016) and poetry collection coiled serpent (2016) and was published in the anthologylove, inshallah (2012). her third poetry chapbook emdash and ellipseswas published in early 2016. taz curates desi music at mishthi musicwhere she co-produced beats for bangladesh and she annually makes #muslimvday cards. her artwork was featured in the shows sharia revoiced (2015), in smithsonian asian pacific american center’s “h1b” (2015), and rebel legacy: activist art from south asian california (2014).you can find her rant on twitter @tazzystar and at tazzystar.blogspot.com.

alan nakagawa is an interdisciplinary artist primarily working with sound, occasionally incorporating video, sculpture, drawing, paint, performance, food and most recently perfumes. since 2014, he has been working on a semi-autobiographic sound-based environment, utilizing multi-point audio field recordings of interiors; peace resonance; hiroshima/wendover combines recordings of the hiroshima atomic dome (hiroshima, japan) and wendover hangar (utah); conical sound; antoni gaudi and simon rodiacombines recordings of watts towers (los angeles) and the sagrada familia (barcelona, spain). nakagawa is currently the artist in resident for great streets, a neighborhood improvement program through the office of the mayor of los angeles. he recently completed a fourteen-month residency with the los angeles department of transportation. other residencies recently completed include the getty villa (2016), smithsonian museum of american history (2015), cerritos college printmaking studio (2017) and echo park film center (2017). he is the host of visitings radio show on dublab radio 99.1 fm, co-founder of the now defunct arts collective collage ensemble inc. (1984-2011) and was the curator of ear meal webcast (2010-2016). nakagawa is a recipient of two art matters grants, city of los angeles artist fellowship, california community foundation mid-career artist fellowship and a monbusho scholarship. alannakagawa.com

jenny yang is a los angeles-based writer, actor and stand up comedian. taiwan-born and southern california-raised, she is a frequent collaborator on viral videos with buzzfeed and fusion that have amassed over 35 million combined views, and actor in digital projects from comedy central, funny or die, mtv, sourcefed/nuclear family, and cracked.com. yang produced the first-ever, mostly female, asian american standup comedy tour, disoriented comedy, and the comedy comedy festival: a comedy festival, a comedy festival showcasing the best in asian american comedic talent. she is also the creator of the viral bad appetite magazine comedy videos that skewer food and "foodie" culture with a satirical edge (#howtoeatpbj / #foodtowork). in 2016, she was honored as a white house champion of change for her leadership in asian american and pacific islander art and storytelling. in 2015, she was dubbed one of los angeles' "most fascinating people" in la weekly's annual "people" issue. yang is a creative change fellow with the opportunity agenda and a google next generation leader. drawing from her former career in politics, she is a regular commentator on politics and pop culture with contributions featured in the new york times, variety, national public radio, msnbc, the guardian, nbc news, bbc news, al jazeera america, complex magazine, southern california public radio, south by southwest, blogher, and numerous college and industry panels. (jennyyang.tv@jennyyangtv)

writ large press is a downtown la based small press. founded in 2007 to publish overlooked los angeles writers, wlp continues to experiment with the idea of publishing and explore the role of the book in society with dtlab, a pop-up bookstore and performance space project, publish!, a continuing underground publishing project, and grand park downtown bookfest, a festival for la writers and publishers. as of june 2017, the press is in a partnership with civil coping mechanisms and entropy. the three publishing entities are known as the accomplices.

beach=culture programs are made possible by santa monica cultural affairs. smgov.net/arts #artsamo

by registering for this program via this eventbrite page, you consent to receiving occasional email about beach house events from beachhouse@smgov,net. you can unsubscribe, or change your preferences at any time using the “unsubscribe” or “manage preferences” links on these emails.

stop by early to save your seat and check out the historic site. picnickers welcome (no pets, alcohol or glass permitted onsite.)

tickets are free but space is limited and reservations are required. arrive by 15 min before start time to retain your reservation. late seating, even for reservation-holders, is not guaranteed. to adjust or cancel your reservation for this event, email culture@smgov.net. we appreciate your keeping in touch!

getting here: the beach house is located at 415 pacific coast highway, santa monica, ca 90402 on the west side of pacific coast highway. enter off pch at the beach house way traffic light.

parking: the parking rate is apr - oct: $12/day or $3/hour; nov - mar: $8/day or $3/hour, payable at the park and pay machines in three areas of the acbh parking lot. credit cards or exact change only. handicapped placards and senior beach permits are accepted. for other parking info and lot hours, please check the website for details.

 

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amwa film series 02: paraspace (second screening)
Aug
23
7:30 PM19:30

amwa film series 02: paraspace (second screening)

amwa (asian mamas working in the arts) is an alliance of women-identifying and non-binary pan-asians who work in the arts and mobilize in los angeles through programming and political actions. for our second film series, we present two nights of pan-asian films around the theme of paraspace.

here, borders collapse. we engage with parallel and alternate realities as a method for survival — to pave new ways for reaching equilibrium via a reimagining of our collective potential and a transcendence of our physical time-space and bodies.  

echo park film center
1200 n alvarado st
7:30pm door
$5 admission

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amwa film series 02: paraspace (first screening)
Aug
22
7:30 PM19:30

amwa film series 02: paraspace (first screening)

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amwa (asian mamas working in the arts) is an alliance of women-identifying and non-binary pan-asians who work in the arts and mobilize in los angeles through programming and political actions. for our second film series, we present two nights of pan-asian films around the theme of paraspace.

here, borders collapse. we engage with parallel and alternate realities as a method for survival — to pave new ways for reaching equilibrium via a reimagining of our collective potential and a transcendence of our physical time-space and bodies.  

echo park film center
1200 n alvarado st
7:30pm door
$5 admission

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it's snowing in la - closing
Jul
14
12:00 PM12:00

it's snowing in la - closing

aa|la is pleased to present it’s snowing in la, a group exhibition by dahn gim, sejin hyun, kang seung lee, haena yoo, minha park, and min ha park. employing a diverse range of media from video and drawing, these artists—all of whom have lived in korea and los angeles—reframe the historical and personal significance of these cities in order to reflect aesthetic, social, and political exchange. by exploring how a city is constructed, fabricated, and imagined, it’s snowing in la navigates cultural identities rooted in transience, remembrance, and a redefining of space.

in the video a story of elusive snow, minha park curiously searches for snow in los angeles as a means of reconnecting with korea, but is ultimately unsatisfied by her discovery of synthetic snow on a hollywood set. sejin hyunreplicates an ikea cataloguein borrowing art from ikea, in order to investigate the nature of fabricated domestic settings irrespective of geographical or cultural context. 

min ha park’s abstracted dayscapes and nightscapes reflect the familiarity of natural and electric lights in seoul and los angeles. drawing upon the iconography of southern california, not so muffled, a sculpture by dahn gim, features a female voice mimicking the sound of an automobile engine, as soft whispers humanize the cacophony of noise typically associated with freeway culture. 

as the center of the korean-american community, the koreatown neighborhood serves a focal point for reflecting on the evolution and history of place. in the installation under construction, haena yoo models a koreatown construction site to which she adds video clips from local restaurants and korean advertisements from the past three decades alongside broadcast coverage of the 1992 los angeles uprising. this exploration of the transforming neighborhood compliments kang seung lee’s use of news imagery from 1992 los angeles uprising. his prints reimagine these featured sites of violence as ghostly memorials to traumatic pasts. 

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amy kahng received her ba in art history from pepperdine university. her primary research interests include performance and media artists working in south korea since the 1970s. in addition to her own curatorial work, amy has worked on projects at art institutions such as the moma, the getty, and kukje gallery as well at artist-run and non-profit galleries spaces. in 2014, she co-curated the international photography exhibition, ecotone: boundaries, tensions, integrations.

mary mcguire received her phd from the history of art and architecture at uc santa barbara. she has completed many curatorial and research projects, including conducting foundational research and artist interviews for the exhibition radical bodies: yvonne rainer, simone forti, and anna halprin in california and new york (2016-2017), exhibited at the new york public library and the uc santa barbara art, design & architecture museum. as an independent curator, she co-curated an extensive exhibition project, i am the medium: art performed on the body, focused on embodied performance art in the work of andrea fraser, mona hatoum, gillian wearing, ana mendieta, franko b., and katarzyna kozyra.

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reconstructing practice / antiracist classroom
Jul
13
to Jul 14

reconstructing practice / antiracist classroom

how can we construct an antiracist art and design practice? how do our curriculum, research practices, and models reinforce or dismantle problematic racial hierarchies? what role does simply occupying space play in this endeavor?

important dates
friday, june 22
registration closes
roundtable discussion proposals due

friday & saturday, july 13 - 14
convening
tickets

accessiblity accommodations
we encourage persons with needs for accessibility accommodations to participate in reconstructing practice’s programs and activities. all participants are welcome. for more information, click here.

contact  
antiracistclassroom@gmail.com

about

the antiracist classroom is a student-led organization at the art center college of design. we’re a group of mostly graduate and undergraduate students, alumni, some staff and faculty, who are committed to cultivating racial equity in art and design education, research, and practice. this event is centered around people, practices, works of art and design, and spaces that seek to embody or enhance racial equity. we see racial equity as the condition of freedom from racially determined experiences and life outcomes, as derived from an intentional and meticulous dismantling of white supremacist frameworks that undergird the institutions in which we operate.

design is touted the world over as a force for global transformation and speculation. meanwhile, many institutions of design—schools, firms, city offices, nonprofits, and more—still fail to imagine and form themselves into institutions that veritably unsettle age-old racial hegemonies and grapple with what it takes to right an obviously imbalanced ship.    

the purpose of this convening is to provide a series of opportunities for young creators—of color, especially—to engage with and through art, design, media and/or technology. we aim for the content to ignite and sustain a movement toward a more racially equitable, informed, and carefully-considered practice and lifetime learning environment. participants will be able to contribute to and learn from the following themes:

01

take up space

occupy physical and virtual space with social events, media, objects, works of art and design, installations and experiences that provoke dialogue, challenge the norm and inspire views of race and equity that we don’t typically encounter in our fields.

02

construct a counter-canon

equip more artists / designers of color [and become equipped themselves] to produce and document art, design, media, technology and writing that contributes to a counter canon or forces the prevailing canon to shift.

 

03

imagine and manifest alternatives

experiment with and model ways that institutions (colleges, design firms, governments, and more) might consider transforming their curriculum, policies, and programming to construct a more inclusive, equitable, critical, or representative reality.

who should attend

our intended audience is artists, designers, technologists, and media creators — especially, but not limited to, people of color — who want to contribute to cultivating an antiracist educational and professional field. this includes:

  • graduate and undergraduate students;

  • educators, staff, and administration at art / technology / design educational institutions, primarily post-secondary institutions and high schools;

  • early career practitioners (e.g. artists, designers, others in relevant roles)

convening organizers

this event is coordianted by the antiracist classroom.

antiracist classroom organizers
godiva veliganilao reisenbichler, accd mdp
bianca nozaki-nasser, accd mdp
lauren williams, accd mdp
nidhi singh rathore, accd mdp

committee members
bryan ortega, accd fine art
allegra padilla, coordinator of community programs at occidental college

faculty advisors
elizabeth chin, accd mdp
arden stern, accd humanities & sciences and mdp
esther pearl watson, accd illustration
everard williams, accd photography

disclaimer

art center is a multidimensional institution. while we are grateful for support received from our academic department, the center for student experience, and the research committee of the college throughout the academic year, we also exist with the express intent of challenging the institution to do better.

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amwa film series 02: shorts submission deadline!
Jul
1
12:01 AM00:01

amwa film series 02: shorts submission deadline!

IMG_5819.jpg

amwa film series 02: shorts presents a selection of pan-asian films around the theme of paraspace.

here, the borders between tangible / digital / imagined, our dreams / feelings / experiences, the past / present / future collapse. we engage with parallel and alternate realities as a method for survival and to pave new ways for comprehending community and normalcy.

please send a short bio and statement (150 words or less) along with your submission to helloamwa@gmail.com.

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city of los angeles (cola 2018) individual artist fellowships exhibition (closing date)
Jun
24
12:00 PM12:00

city of los angeles (cola 2018) individual artist fellowships exhibition (closing date)

city of los angeles (cola 2018) individual artist fellowships exhibition

may 3 – june 24, 2018
gallery hours:
Thursday – Sunday
12 – 5 PM

los angeles – the city of los angeles department of cultural affairs (dca) is pleased to announce the 2017/18 city of los angeles (cola) individual artist fellowship recipients. these fellows will produce a new body of work with grants of $10,000 each and their new works will be premiered by the city of los angeles in the spring of 2018.

the 2017/18 c.o.l.a. fellows in the design/visual arts, literary arts*, and performing arts** are: dave hullfish bailey, guillermo bert, terry braunstein, cassils, sandra de la loza, michelle dizon, tim durfee, june edmonds, d. sabela grimes**, peter j. harris*, michele o’marah, julie shafer, and doris sung, kristina wong**

these fellows were chosen in three review-rounds by nine interdisciplinary peer panelists who were curators, educators, non-profit gallerists, museum directors, and/or past cola fellows.

“c.o.l.a. fellows are the types of unique civic entrepreneurs that we need in this city,” said dca general manager danielle brazell. “dca is proud to honor these creative visionaries and nurture their symbiotic relationships with la and other artists and the city’s history and identity as an international arts capital.”

“c.o.l.a. fellows represent the spectrum of la’s exemplary mid-career artists,” said dca grants administration division director joe smoke. “the c.o.l.a. grants allow these accomplished, influential, and not yet ultra-famous artists to create new work that the city of los angeles will premiere for the general public in one or more group presentations accompanied by a promotional catalog as well as educational artist talks.”

the c.o.l.a. visual arts exhibition will take place at dca’s los angeles municipal art gallery located at 4800 hollywood boulevard in barnsdall park; and the c.o.l.a. performance and literary showcase will occur at grand performances at california plaza in downtown la. the c.o.l.a. 2018 catalog will be designed and published by susan silton, a former c.o.l.a. awardee.

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